Kara Dennison

Nerd princess taking on the world. Writing for Crunchyroll, VRV, Viewster, and Sartorial Geek. Social media and interviews for (Re)Generation Who and PotterVerse.


How Do You Want to Do This? ~ An Introduction to “Critical Role”

The idea of tabletop gaming as public entertainment is nothing new. Japan published “replays” of Dungeons & Dragons campaigns (with one becoming the famous Record of Lodoss War), and just about anyone with a camera can set up a stream of their friends’ gaming group. But what if the people behind the characters were actually actors — and familiar voices, at that?

That’s the concept behind Critical Role, a gaming group’s D&D 5th Edition campaign done live on Geek & Sundry. But as of 2018, the take of Vox Machina has expanded far beyond its earliest days.


Martial Arts History Reborn: Why “Shaolin” Is a Must-See Kung Fu Flick

A powerful man does horrible things, finds himself hoisted on his own petard, and must learn kung fu in order to atone for his ways and find peace. If the story sounds familiar, there’s a good reason — well, several good reasons, actually.

The 2011 Shaolin is a martial arts epic starring performer-of-all-trades Andy Lau as Hou Jie, a clever but hotheaded warlord whose ambitions get the better of him. After slaying a rival taking refuge at the Shaolin Monastery and mocking the monks before he leaves, he sets out to eliminate another enemy. But Cao Man, Hou’s second-in-command, double crosses him. And before long, Hou has nowhere to seek refuge but the very place he killed a man not long before.


The Art of Anxiety: Why “Living in Oblivion” Will Blow Your Mind

There are lots of ways a piece of art can be “mind-blowing.” The easiest is to create something that looks weird and makes no dang sense. And that’s probably the easiest way to go about it — because making something not make sense doesn’t actually take a lot of work. But one of the hardest, and most effective, is to create something extremely personal and extremely relatable under the weirdness. Something that, when you step back from it, makes complete sense.

Living in Oblivion starts out as one, slowly pulling its strings together and becoming the other over the course of the movie. Because somewhere between the flashbacks, the explosions, and the apple-wielding dwarfs, there’s something a lot of us can relate to: the anxiety of doing our job well.